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20121121
20121129
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KQED (PBS) 33
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in washington, d.c. and an example of a dysfunctional process. that threatens our economy and millions of people across our economy. pete: is stalemate in washington stifling the economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together. to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> this rock has never stood still. since 1875, we've been there for our clients through good times and bad. when their needs changed, we were there to meet them. through the years, from insurance to investment
newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington's struggle to avoid going off the "fiscal cliff" resumed in earnest today. the president moved to draw on his reelection victory for new clout with congress. the goal: a sweeping deficit agreement to avert $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases at the start of 2013. from the white house came word that president obama will try to build public pressure on congress to raise taxes on the wealthy and prevent tax hikes for everyone else. white house spokesman jay carney. >> well, the president believes very strongly that the american people matter in this debate. because this debate is about t
from us, depending on congress, to follow. that is a boost to his economy. again, he has to show results on the ground. he has to do two different things. show his government is legitimate to. and he has to show he can build jobs and clean up the trash and produce safety and the streets. >> there has been some successes as well. thank you for coming in. now to the mystery in the west bank, the body of yasser arafat was exhumed a few hours ago so the scientists can find out if the leader was poisoned to death. the move follows a documentary which reported that traces of the radioactive elements polonium had been found on his clothing. eight years after his death, what could this investigation uncovered? we have this report. >> it looks down from billboards and posters. the man who dominance -- dominated politics for decades. revered by most and reviled by many israelis, yasir arafat died in 2004 after falling suddenly and violently ill. eight years later, and beyond prying eyes, his tomb was opened and samples of his remains were removed. all of this after a tv documentary said it
assess what makes consumers spend, and what impact all those purchases have on the economy. >> brown: we have two stories about continuing unrest in the middle east, beginning with the political crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. an
the fiscal cliff, saying it might mean next year could be "a very good one for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. >> uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions, and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets. >> susie: wall street and business leaders were pleased that bernanke was talking tough. and they said the fed's role in the fiscal cliff negotiations is to communicate. >> tell the world and the individuals in the political establishment that they have to help get their act together or we have a problem, and that notion of preaching from the pulpit
to the nation's economy. >> reporter: tomorrow is the most important sales day of the year for pam nelson, co-owner of butter lane bakery in manhattan. >> it's our biggest day of the year. valentine's day used to be our biggest day of the year. now it is, by far, small business saturday. >> reporter: last year, sales quadrupled the saturday after thanksgiving. this year, she's hoping for even bigger gains. todd and leisl gibson are also hoping for a surge in orders tomorrow. the husband and wife team own a craft products business called leisl and company. small business saturday was also their biggest sales day last year. >> that one saturday, we did about 20 times our typical order volume for a regular saturday. >> reporter: special promotions and marketing clearly help drive sales. but the firms say customers also like supporting business owners they know. >> they like the fact that they feel like they know leisl. and they know todd. and they see pictures of our daughter. and they know when they buy patterns from us, they're helping support us. >> reporter: supporting small businesses is al
: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: demonstrations, clashes with the police, and tear gas in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt'
? what will it do to our economy? >> i don't think it will do that much because i think people will assume that a solution will be found quite promptly. it's a little like the debt ceiling question. i mean, people know -- the rest of the world may think that we're idiotic at times but they don't think we're going to commit suicide. and so i think if -- i hope something gets worked out before january 1, but if it goes a little beyond that i do not think -- >> rose: so january 10 or -- >> if you guaranteed me that the fiscal cliff we would go past that, i wouldn't sell a share of stock today. >> rose: you have that confidence that in the end they will fix it? >> yeah, and this that think economy works. >> rose: is it getting better? >> it's getting better. it's been getting better since really the summer of 2009. we've had four years straight now where the stock market's given a profit of return. the economy is getting better. we had a tremendous bubble and when it burst it was -- it had ramifications for all aspects of society and it was magnified by the abuses that had taken pl
on its feet, it involves finding a way to help greece's economy actually return to growth. while some of the terms of the deals were a little more favorable than many had feared, at the end of the day, you have to find a way to help these economies grow. that probably means pausing some of that austerity. >> susie: you talk about it being a favorable deal, and you picture that other troubled companies in europe are saying, i want a deal just like greece got. what does that mean for the european economic recovery? >> i think it certainly complicates things a little bit. there is clearly an issue of moral hazard. many other countries may look to the deal that greece got and say, hey, maybe i can get a similar-type deal. in the end, when we think about what is plaguing personal europe, a lot of it has to do with austerity which has been forced on the economies, which are really, really depressed, and pushes them deeper into the hole. part of what needs to be done moving forward is pausing some of that austerity. you can't go to a country in a very bad recession, and tell them to increase
the economy? >> times are a little better. a little more idea last year. we can definitely spend a little more. not a lot more, but a little more. >> once we have spent enough, we stop. >> i want to make the kids happy, grandkids, that sort of thing. i am going to spend more to make everybody happy. >> that will make the retailers happy too. they have been forced to cut prices to keep hold of customers, and that has hit profits. >> retail has been tricky this year. it is not that the consumer is not spending, but they are spending in spurts. they are distracted by economic issues, political issues, even natural disaster. the consumer has found lots of reasons to spend but then stop. >> come the new year, they may have even less to spend. consumers will likely feel less well-off with coming tax hikes and spending cuts. even more reason for retailers to cash in now. >> for more on the black friday rash, i spoke a brief time ago with a bloomberg tv anger in new york. stephanie, thank you for coming in instead of doing a bit of shopping yourself. >> i am happier to be with you than wrestling at wa
, which will be one where the egyptians will be able to take control of their economy much more so than before. it tells you that the egyptians feel they own the country, and that is very important. >> what do you say of the critique that if you can simply replaced one ferro with another? >> i would say it is not that -- one ferro -- pharoah with another? >> i would say it is not that bad. in the old days under a pharoah there would be no protests in the street. today, people feel empowered to control their destinies. >> even if people are demonstrating for a better future, where will the jobs come from? but i am one that believes the egyptian economy has been repressed for a long time. with proper management and an inclusive growth model, as opposed to one that just serves special interests, and with help from outside, egypt can unleash its private-sector. if that materializes, then drops will materialize and party will go down. -- jobs will materialize and poverty will go down. it is a bumpy voyage, but possible. >> how can he do to fill the role of law, which is all important? -- ho
. britain had the best and most transparent economy on earth. 15 years on, being difficult a stronger than ever. >> in the decades after world war two, hundreds of native american children were taken from their communities and given the families of foster care. they are helping those affected deal with the trauma. >> in the reservations, we were surrounded by water. we did not have power, we did not have sewer, and we lived in a lot of poverty. two station wagons pulled up and put us girls in the station wagon and drove away with us. i do not remember having been in the car before. i was taken into custody and put into a white foster homes. we thought we would survive better. >> the idea was to help them assimilate into the white culture. the indian child love her act was passed in 1978 because there was a recognition that india children were removed from their homes at a much higher rate than other children. even with that being passed, it did not have a lot of power to really change some of the practices. >> i remember the state coming in and taking us, they did not tell us where they we
cole. >> you're not going to grow the economy if you raise tax rates on the top two rates. it'll hurt small businesses, it'll hurt our economy, it's why it's not the right approach. we're willing to put revenue on the table as long as we're not raising rates. >> brown: despite the president's talk of changing minds, "politico's" manu raju says that privately, house republicans think they can win this fight. >> right now the republican leadership feels pretty confident that they have most of their folks in line. they all generally support keeping tax rates low for virtually for every single income group. they do not want to see incomes increase for that top tax bracket. >> brown: meanwhile, on the senate floor, minority leader mitch mcconnell criticized democrats for putting social security off limits in any deficit deal. >> as for social security, the only thing we hear from why in the world wouldn't they want to talk about the fact that this vital program started spending out more than it took in 2010, for the first time in nearly 30 years and that its trustees now estimate that it w
of something, you reduce taxes on it. if you want less of something, you tax it more. in our economy right now, with a lot of money sitting idle on the sidelines, and a lot of people unemployed, the last thing we want to do is, you know, increase taxes on investments which will, therefore, result in less investments and less jobs. >> tom: we have more with lew hay tomorrow on our thanksgiving special, "looking at the fiscal cliff." >> susie: the thanksgiving holiday marks one of the busiest travel times of the year, and airlines are expected to have a blockbuster weekend. they could use it. the airlines have struggled to find profits over the past decade. sylvia hall reports. >> reporter: it's one of the busiest days of the year for airlines, as people jet across the country to and from their holiday destinations. the airlines expect to fill a total of 24 million seats between today and sunday, according to airlines for america. that's an average of 2.5 million seats filled each day, up by a quarter of a million from last year. >> this year so far, the average profit point for every passenger
, showing that unless there's a deal on solving the crisis, the u.s. economy would suffer big time. the obama administration's economists estimate consumers would spend about $200 billion less next year than they would have otherwise. congress and the administration have only a few more weeks to nail down a deal. but that deal will have to address some tough issues, including entitlement reform. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: the big money in entitlements is in health care, and that means any grand bargain to avoid the fiscal cliff will slice away at one of the nation's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you don't get long-term savings. >> reporter: progressives at the center for american progress say the
-- in an italian. ♪ >> i think america is not anymore the most important economy, but it is the most important center of production. it is like being in florence during the renaissance. hear, history is happening out. -- history is happening here. all i'm doing is giving back to my people by being here. i like to think that they are waiting for me to come back from this experience. ♪ >> introducing his music to a whole new audience in new york. and we could not leave you without the final story from washington. today, the president and his two daughters took part in the annual thanksgiving right of pardoning two turkeys. it is a tradition that stretches back to the 1960's. that brings the program to a close. you confide constant updates on our website. i'm laura trevelyan. thank you for watching. to those of you in the u.s., have a happy thanksgiving. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relation
it is the economy. some will say neighborhood conditions, the families and schools. that is just confirming our own biases. we are often talking past each other. it just feels like people calling in, the same talking points of people being oppressed or lazy. i want to change because it should push them from that c aring. tavis: the science tell us -- what does science tell us about that? dr. the biggest impact is the biology of stress, the way that when kids grow up around stress that is chronic and intense, it gets under the skin and alaska lifetime. it affects the kind of skills that matter so much. the other set of research that is important is about connections with parents. when kids are able to form close bonds with a parent, how they are somewhat protected from that. when you find kids that are able to make that jump out of poverty, whether a parent or somebody else is able to help them. all that plays out in schools, when you have neighborhoods with concentrated poverty, that means there will be more conflict or about the stress. tavis: what is the data saying to you about those kinds of to
that the wealthy are job creators and they may not be able to stimulate the economy as much as a mite -- as they might. >> absolutely, that is their argument and one buffett argued that this is a great opportunity -- and warren buffett argued that if there is a great opportunity, people will not turn it down because the tax rate is not lower. what we have seen in the last two or three decades is the middle class income is stagnating, even as the very top has grown. trickle-down is not working. ameriprise to think of something else. >> thank you -- america house to think of something else. >> thank you for joining me. several people were killed when a fire broke out al-zawahiri workshop for disabled people. more than 100 firefighters were called -- broke out when a workshop for disabled people caught on fire. more than 100 firefighters were called to the scene. >> it happened in a small town in southwest germany. it was a workshop for physically disabled people at a project run by the catholic charity caritas. some people were trapped and contents were made by firefighters in breathing
e-book, "the amazon economy," is out next week. thanks for being with us. >> good to be here. >> sreenivasan: so help us understand, why are these retailers doing this? why is it so important? >> this holiday season we're going to see consumers who are still pretty cautious and as a result of that retailers are just a little bit desperate. these early openings are all about trying to grab the attention of consumers as soon as they can and grab a few of those dollars because overall the holiday season it may be that the shopping pie doesn't grow that much. so these retailers want to grab their own slice as soon as they possibly can. >> sreenivasan: so wal-mart was one of the big stores to do so. they were already opening at midnight. why push it into thanksgiving day itself? >> the competition among the retailers and i think they're inspiring each other to move it earlier and earlier because as people are going to be queuing up perhaps they want to be outside the store that's going to open first. so this cream phenomena is has set in as retailers are trying to outdo each other
their economy and not be governed by a set of ideological imper it was. >> rose: said another way, morsi government has to prove it can govern? >> it does have to prove it can govern. one of the things that is interesting you do have leaderships now that do have to pay attention to their public, their republicans have expectations and needs and hopes, and one of those is that, in fact the needs of the public will be addressed. >> rose: is it possible coming out of this is something positive in terms of future relationship between palestinians and israelis and between israelis and new arab governments? is that possible here? >> it helps the relationship -- egypt and israel. they have worked together pretty well, it also improved the relationship between netanyahu government and our own government. they have worked together pretty well over the last week as well. >> rose: do you agree with that, dennis, we are looking at where there was a fractured relationship it might be getting better? >> i do, i think one of the most significant things is that you have a very different egyptian govern
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)